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Scientific name: Balaena glacialis
Common name: Southern right whale
Taxonomy
Phyulm Sub Phylum Class Sub Class Order Sub Order Family Sub Family Genus Species
Chordata Vertebrata Mammalia Theriformes Cete Cetacea Balaenidae Not Defined Balaena Balaena glacialis

       

Short Description:

The Southern Right Whale also known as the (Eubalaena australis) is a baleen whale, one of three species classified as right whales belonging to the genus Eubalaena. Like other right whales, the Southern Right Whale is readily distinguished from others by the callosities on its head, a broad back without a dorsal fin, and a long arching mouth that begins above the eye. Its skin is very dark grey or black, occasionally with some white patches on the belly. The right whale's callosities appear white due to large colonies of cyamids (whale lice).

Identification
features:
The Southern Right Whale was initially described as Balaena australis by Desmoulins in 1822. It has been reclassified repeatedly, most recently as a species separate from the other right whales, and may be reclassified again into its original genus because scientists now find greater differences among the three Balaenoptera species than between the Bowhead Whale, the only current member of Balaena, and the right whales.
All four species may be placed in one genus in a future reviewSynonyms for E. australis have included B. antarctica (Lesson, 1828), B. antipodarum (Gray, 1843), E. temminckii (Gray, 1864) 
Size: 14-15m 
Behaviour: Behavior unique to the Southern Right Whale, known as sailing, is that of using their elevated flukes to catch the wind. It appears to be a form of play and is commonly seen off the coast of Argentina and South Africa
Diet: Small copepods(1 ton of krill a day) 
Distribution: The Southern Right Whale spends summer in the far Southern Ocean feeding, probably close to Antarctica. It migrates north in winter for breeding and can be seen by the coasts of Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Chile, Namibia, Mozambique, Peru, Tristan de Cunha, Uruguay, Madagascar, New Zealand and South Africa 
Depth: 1500m
Habitat: Pelagic
Reference:
  •  Two Oceans
    (A guide to the marine life of Southern Africa
    )
    GM Branch;CL Griffiths;ML Branch;LE Beckley
  • A field guide to the Marine Animals of the Cape Peninsula
    Georgina Jones
  • Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    www.wikipedia.org/ 
Similar Species:
  • None on database

Database Statistics
(Click on the links for more information)
Photographer Date City Area Dive site Temp Size Depth Camera Photo Video
Jacques Alberts-(Jeffreys Bay) 2011-07-22 Port Elizabeth Algoa Bay (EC)-Eastern Cape General Coastline 16 14m 1m Fujifilm Finepix F50fd photo
Johan Swanepoel-(Port Elizabeth) 2009-10-17 Port Elizabeth Wildside (PE-WS)-Crossroads 13 8m 0m Canon Powershot G10 photo
Johan Swanepoel-(Port Elizabeth) 2009-10-17 Port Elizabeth Wildside (PE-WS)-Crossroads 13 8m 0m Canon Powershot G10 photo
Johan Swanepoel-(Port Elizabeth) 2009-10-17 Port Elizabeth Wildside (PE-WS)-Crossroads 13 8m 0m Canon Powershot G10 photo
Johan Swanepoel-(Port Elizabeth) 2009-10-17 Port Elizabeth Wildside (PE-WS)-Crossroads 13 8m 0m Canon Powershot G10 photo
Juan Snyman-(Port Elizabeth) 2009-10-17 Port Elizabeth Wildside (PE-WS)-Crossroads 13 8m 0m Sony DSC-W150 photo
Lloyd Edwards-(Port Elizabeth) 2009-08-16 Port Elizabeth Algoa Bay (EC)-Eastern Cape General Coastline 15 14m 1m Nikon D200 photo
Lloyd Edwards-(Port Elizabeth) 2008-10-03 Port Elizabeth Algoa Bay (EC)-Eastern Cape General Coastline 17 12m 1m Nikon D200 photo
 
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eastern cape scuba diving