eastern cape scuba diving
 
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Dive Type: Boat Dive Depth: 8m - 16 m Diver Qualification: Open Water Diver

Suicide Reef is one of the shallow reefs and is perfect for all divers only when the conditions are calm. The name says it all! It can be very nasty if there are swells and there is often a breaking surfline on outer Suicide which is the dive spot.

The wreck of the Strathblane lies inshore and was the result of Suicide with its pinnacles rising from 15m up to 4m and running along parallel with the shore for some 200m.

Approach is from the SW and the drop off zone is into a basin of about 9m deep just off the pillars which rise to about 4 to 5m from the surface.

Start by taking the inside route which is usually protected and warmer leading into sand gullies shielded from the sea  by the pillars and walls. Fish life is abundant, safe from shore and boat fishing and ranges from small bait clusters to Stingrays, bronze Shark, Rock Cod and the ever present white Mussel Cracker and shy Poenslop.

A “third of air supply” along, find a crevice to crossover to the sea side and double back along the outside wall. The wall is punctured by inlets and has a sandy bottom at 13 to 14m. This part of the reef is a favourite for Yellowtail and Bonita, usually just below the surface.

Try to fin away from the reef into deeper water before surfacing. This make it easier for the boat to retrieve divers.

There is very little seaweed or fern growth but exciting and definitely a spot for fish activity.

Noordhoek ski-boat club
http://www.nsbcpe.co.za/divesites.php
 
Specie List for Dive site: (PE-WS)-Suicide Reef
(Click on the links for more information)
Specie
Bonisa nakaza-1 (Gas flame nudibranch)
Boopsoidea incornata (Frans madam)
Chaetodon marleyi (Doublesash butterflyfish)
Chrysaora sp (Frilly mouthed jelly fish)
Diplodus sargus capensis (Blacktail seabream)
Epinephelus marginatus (Yellowbelly rockcod)
Janolus capensis (Silvertip nudibranch)
Pupillaea aoerta-2 (Spotted manteled keyhole limpet)
Rhabdosargus holubi (Cape stumpnose)
Sarpa salpa (Strepie)
Tambja capensis (Black nudibranch)
 
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eastern cape scuba diving